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Ferris State University receives $1.2 million grant to increase STEM retention rates

Ferris State University (FSU) recently received a $1.2 million grant from the National Science Foundation to fund a new initiative called Project S3OAR (pronounced SOAR three), short for Sustainable, Scalable Scholarships, Opportunities, Achievements, and Results, in collaboration with Northern Kentucky University (NKU). The initiative will focus on low-income STEM major students, funding up to $10,000 toward their degree. Beginning in the fall of 2019, 36 students will be enrolled in the program, continuing for the next five years.

Although there are many initiatives across the country that encourage students to pursue STEM disciplines — some beginning as early as middle school — many educational institutions struggle to retain these majors at the higher level.

Across the country, retention rate percentages for STEM majors range from high 60s to the low 70s, and at Ferris State University, that statistic sits at 73 percent. One of the objectives of Project S3OAR is to increase this rate to 90 percent. Ferris State University’s Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences Dr. Kristi Haik says the main reasons these retention rates are low is due to a combination of STEM disciplines being generally challenging to succeed in and a lack of academic preparedness from students.

Dr. Haik reflected on her journey as STEM major, and connected her own experiences to those of the students with whom she works.

“When they get here and run into some really intense challenges, it’s hard and they might not know where to get the help,” she says. “I had great grades in high school and I thought I knew how to study, and then had a rude awakening. I have worked with students to do this program for years, and they all say exactly what I said ... ‘I thought I knew what I was doing, and then I got to college.’”

Prior to FSU, Dr. Haik was working at NKU, where the program was originally established in 2009. A year ago, she proposed that the grant-funded program continue at NKU, and would use that as a model to implement at FSU.

One of the important lessons learned from the program at NKU is that students need a support system to succeed.

“They’re not going to always want to seek help, even though they might need it,” says Dr. Haik. “So working with them, meeting with them, having somebody who is their champion on campus… really serves as that support system.”

The program will also give students the opportunity to shadow employees in the STEM field early in their program, for four to eight hours long, to decide if they want to commit to that career path.

“A lot of times, we hear from students, it was in their internship or junior year when they got connected to somebody at a business, when they ‘got it’ –– that this is something they really want to do,” says Dr. Haik.

Project S3OAR’s other objectives include increasing the enrollment of low-income and underrepresented groups by 10 percent, thus bringing STEM retention and graduation rates for these populations in line with the rest of the university; documenting the program’s sustainability and scalability; and conducting research on the effectiveness of job shadowing in increasing the retention rate from the first year into the next.

In response to the program’s success at NKU, the target goals of the program being met in the next few years to come seem likely. Overall, the program will allow students to think about a wider range of career paths –– a more optimistic future that opens the doors for underrepresented students.

Photos courtesy of Ferris State University.
 

New year, new job: The winter jobs roundup

Habitat for Humanity

Site Supervisor

The Site Supervisor oversees and works directly with volunteers and home buyer families to provide instruction while ensuring site safety and producing a positive Habitat site experience. This position will also manage the warranty program with existing homeowners, as well as work on educational builds alongside students and instructors. This position requires the ability to build homes to code through all phases of construction, while keeping on schedule. Preferred qualifications include a state of Michigan builder’s license and five years minimum supervisory experience in the remodeling/new construction industry. Candidates must be passionate about the mission of Habitat, be a team player and willing to foster relationships during the build process.

Send resumes by February 9, 2018 to hr@habitatkent.org. No phone calls or walk-ins.

Material Recovery Supervisor
The Material Recovery Supervisor will coordinate and perform recovery projects to obtain donated gifts that require physical removal and disassembly from the donor’s premises to be sold in Habitat for Humanity of Kent County ReStores or to be used in Habitat for Humanity of Kent County building projects.

This is a full-time hourly position with benefits. Send resumes by February 13, 2018 to: hr@habitatkent.org. No phone calls or walk-ins.

D.A. Blodgett St. John's

Residential Therapists (Seeking one for Cebelak and one for Elenbaas)
Full-time youth and family therapist for middle school-aged children residing in our residential facility. Work focuses on healing past trauma, developing a healthy identity, learning independent living skills, and preparing for permanent placements. The ideal candidate will have strong therapeutic skills and expertise. Skills in substance abuse treatment, trauma informed treatment, EMDR, motivational interviewing, and CBT are preferred.

Qualifications:
MSW or similar degree and State License / Limited License required.

Multi-Systemic Therapist (What is MST, you ask? MST is an intensive, family-focused and community-based treatment program for chronically violent youth.)
Full-time Master’s level therapist, who is organized and highly engaging, for our MST (Multi-Systemic Therapy) program. MST is an evidenced-based therapy program to treat teenagers with delinquent behaviors by working with the parents as the change-agents. Therapy occurs in the home and community.

Qualifications:
LMSW, LPC, LMFT, or LP (limited or full license) is required and a minimum of one year of counseling experience is preferred. Further information about the counseling model can be found at www.mstservices.com. Bilingual and culturally diverse persons are encouraged to apply. EOE.

Advancement Services Manager (Brand new position!)
APPLICATION DEADLINE: FEBRUARY 1, 2018
The Advancement Services Manager provides leadership and oversight of donor management systems and strategies, special events, administrative support, donor communication and direct mail appeals and other fundraising activities. The Advancement Services Manager supervises the Advancement Assistant and Events Coordinator, reporting to the Chief Advancement Officer.

Qualifications:
A minimum of five years of experience in advancement functions. Familiar with fundraising principles and donor strategies and working knowledge of donor management strategies and systems (Raiser’s Edge NXT preferred). Supervisory experience preferred. Proven leadership abilities and successful experience managing multiple projects. Bachelor’s degree from a four-year college or university preferred.

Second and Third Shift Youth Development Specialist – Residential Program
Full time, counselor role providing direct care for children and youth living in an open residential program. Counselors see to the physical and emotional needs of the children and youth who have experienced some form of abuse and/or neglect. Counselors will model and teach appropriate social skills while working closely with a staff therapist to implement individualized treatment plans. This role demands an individual with strong relationship building skills, physical and emotional stamina and an ability to work in a team environment in order to provide a family like setting. Counselors act in a parental role by meeting basic needs of youth.

Qualifications:
High School diploma or equivalent required. Associates and/or Bachelor's degree in Psychology, Sociology, Social Work, Youth Ministries, Criminal Justice and/or Communications a plus. Valid driver’s license with a good driving record is required. Those interested in a career in the child welfare field or those with a desire to help struggling children and teenagers are encouraged to apply.

Supports Coordinator
For those who have a passion for working with children who have developmental disabilities. Full-time position providing individual case management to children with developmental disabilities. Job requires linking, monitoring, and coordinating services within the family system and the community. Services are provided in the home setting and some evening hours are required.

Qualifications:
Minimum education requirements include a 4 year degree in the following: psychology, physician, education from an accredited program, social work, physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech-language pathology, audiology, registered nurse, registered dietician, therapeutic recreation, or a licensed or limited-licensed professional counselor. Experience working with culturally diverse populations and one year of experience working with clients diagnosed with developmental disabilities preferred. Bilingual persons are encouraged to apply.

Foster Care Case Aide and Community Living Supports Aide
Wonderful part-time opportunities; perfect for college students working towards a Human Services degree.

Apply here.

John Ball Zoo

Marketing Manager
John Ball Zoo is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit corporation, with a mission to inspire people to be active participants in the conservation of wildlife and our natural environment. We are seeking an energetic Marketing Manager to join our team. In collaboration with the Chief Development Officer, the Marketing Manager designs, develops, and directs the implementation of all media relations, advertising, promotions, and public relations activities for the Zoo.

Apply here.

Wolverine Worldwide

Director Of Retail Marketing
This position will play a critical role in developing integrated marketing strategies and plans for key wholesale accounts and DTC channels. Responsible for working closely with the Category marketing directors, Sales leadership, and internal stakeholders to develop account and channel specific campaigns designed to ensure that the brand is effectively represented and communicated to our end consumers. This position will have marketing responsibility over all wholesale channels of trade along with our DTC channels, with the goal of driving awareness and sales within those channels. This role will also work closely with the Sales team to develop key sales tools for our sales force in order to improve product sell-in and sell-thru at retail.

Apply here.

Calvin College

Writer and Marketing Coordinator
To reach prospective students, this position will create strategic, compelling and on-brand content across a variety of communication channels. Collaborate with creative professionals, tell the stories of world-changing Calvin students, and connect with high school students about the benefits of a Calvin education. This position will be part of a team that executes marketing initiatives across many channels, including email, print, web, digital advertising, and video.

Apply here.

Herman Miller

Senior Marketing Specialist - Focused Markets
As a Senior Marketing Specialist - Focused Markets, you'll be responsible for developing and implementing marketing strategies and tactical plans to successfully support Herman Miller's business objectives in two key areas within the North America Contract business: Healthcare and Higher Education. You will also be responsible for leading the implementation of projects, programs, and initiatives from concept, design, development, and delivery to achieve goals.

Apply here.

Meijer

Brand Planner
This position is responsible for building marketing platforms and campaigns, guiding campaign and marketing plan development and cross-channel integration. This role is integral in bringing cross-functional partners together to build campaigns—Merchants, Promo Planning, Business Ops, Customer Insights, Media, Content Planning and Creative Teams, translating business and communication objectives into marketing campaigns that prompt meaningful customer action.

Apply here.

Byrne Electrical Specialists

Jr. Digital Marketing Specialist
Execute and plan Byrne’s digital marketing strategy, managing and publishing targeted content to drive engagement, growth and revenue goals across digital channels.

Apply here.

West Michigan Whitecaps

Community Relations Street Team
The Community Relations Street Team is responsible for escorting mascots at community events. Street Team members must be upbeat, outgoing individuals with the ability to interact with all types of people. The Community Relations Street Team performs all job tasks in compliance with the philosophy, policies, goals, and budget of Whitecaps Professional Baseball, Inc.

Apply here.

Inner City Christian Federation

Resident Engagement Specialist
The Resident Engagement Specialist adjusts and implements successful neighbor engagement programs. Job functions include team collaboration, program development, outcomes planning and improvement, resident event planning and execution, focus groups and surveys, and relationship building to support residents to meet their personal and housing goals. Goals of this program include increased opportunity, strong relationships, and housing stability.

Please submit your resume with a cover letter to hr@iccf.org or Traci Douglas, tdouglas@humanresourcepotential.com. ICCF is an EEO employer.
 

New City Urban Café: Social enterprise empowers and builds community

In the fight for empowerment of community youth, New City Neighbors, an organization in the Creston Neighborhood working to build meaningful community and urban renewal projects for youth in the neighborhood, is using a social enterprise model to launch their newest endeavor, New City Urban Café and continue to empower youth from the Creston Neighborhood through employment and leadership development opportunities. New City Urban Café opened its’ doors on July 13 of this year, serving wood-fired pizzas, soups, and salads made by high school student staff from New City Farm produce. The cafe also features baked goods made by the New City Bakery program, a job skills and leadership training program for middle school students.
 
Overall, in 2016 New City Neighbors hired 29 high school students to work in the farm, the bakery and the after school program. The farm and cafe is employing 15 high school students this summer, and will employ six during the school year. Additional, high school students will be employed in New City Neighbors' elementary afterschool and summer day camp programs. 
 
“Our employment and leadership opportunities are the first building blocks for their resumes and college applications. Being employed in high school gives students greater hope for future job prospects and encourages them to stay engaged in their education,” shares Alaina Dobkowski, executive director of New City Neighbors.
 
For New City Neighbors, the social enterprise model is not anything new. When Lance Kraai was hired as Farm Director for New City Urban Farm in 2012, the farm was an empty lot behind Fourth Reformed Church. Kraai saw the promise of possibility and life in the land. He saw the empty lot as an opportunity to help employ youth from the neighborhood, grow, harvest and sell  food for their community.  

New City Neighbors is located in a United States Department of Agriculture designated food desert in Grand Rapids. In other words, a significant large number of the neighborhood residents have low access to a supermarket or large grocery store.   
 
The farm uses the community supported agriculture model to sell produce to 180 shareholders, while offering customers the option to pay with food stamps and participate in the Double Up Food Bucks program.
 
“We are able to create opportunities for families to access fresh produce that is grown in their own neighborhood,” explains Dobkowski.
 
New City Urban Café brings it all to full circle, shares Dobkowski. By adding a kitchen into the farm programming, employed youth are able to complete their journey from seed to plate.
 
“Growing leeks is one thing, but growing, cooking, and eating leeks is another. We also wanted to incorporate more cross-age partnership and mentoring. By bringing the kitchen work of the high school students and adding it to the existing bakery program of the middle school students, New City Cafe provides a space for students of different ages to work together and learn from each other,” says Joel Schramm, Farm & Kitchen Manager.
 
For Schramm, the success of the program has been due to the social enterprise model that allows for a  diversification of funding.
 
“While we work hard to create and maintain relationships with donors, the revenue stream of our enterprises gives us a little more financial sustainability. It is also possible that constantly considering things with a business perspective has been one of the aspects of our organization that has made us lean and responsible with our money,” says Schramm.
 
At New City Urban Café, you can expect middle and high school students learning job skills to provide every customer with a high quality product, served in a professional manner.  Outside, you will see a three-acre working farm with high school students learning to grow, and harvest produce. Inside, you will find dozens of elementary youth studying, building relationships, and having fun.
 
New City Urban Café is open every Thursday until August 10, 12-6:30 pm. The café is located on 1226 Union Avenue NE.

Michelle Jokish Polo is Rapid Growth's On The Ground Editor. To connect with Michelle, you can email her at michellejokisch@gmail.com and follow her on Facebook and Instagram.

Job hunting? These tips will help your search

Searching for a new job? The prospect of a new job can be exciting (and daunting), so here are some tips to aid in your search for your new gig or career.

These recommendations can be applied pretty much across the board, no matter what job level you’re seeking or the type of career you’d like to land. Whether you’re an aspiring yogi, programmer or recent college graduate, having a method to the madness that is job hunting will always give you a leg up on the competition.


Just like any good athlete will do and tell you: don’t get ready; stay ready! Be sure to always have a current resume, always be building new contacts and strengthening old ones. As well as always learning and seek growth opportunities.

Be present in the work you are doing. You never know when you will have to ask for a recommendation. As the saying goes, find the work you love and you will never have to work again. This is very true. Although you may feel pressured to take the first high paying job that comes across, remember that a job is not necessarily a career -- and a career must cohabit with your personal life.

Increase your network. It’s not all about business card swapping; rather, aim to build meaningful relationships with a greater diversity of people. These relationships will help when searching for and securing new job opportunities. A cursory search into famous business, movie, or historical figures will show you that. Grand Rapids groups that can help you with networking include Equity DrinksBLEND and Drinks & Digital.

Do you have a mentor, coach and sponsor? Do you know the difference?

Non-profit organization Catalyst states it elegantly: “A coach talks to you; a mentor talks with you; a sponsor talks about you.”

A coach will help guide you through your career development. You can have more than one coach, and they do not necessarily have to be from your same career field.

A mentor is there to help you navigate your career choices. This relationship is often limited to fewer people, and many people often settle on one person as their mentor. Your mentor does not necessarily have to be from your career field, but having one that does often deepens the relationship and the wisdom that they provide.

A sponsor is like your promoter; they are someone in your career field that has a senior or influential status that can speak on your character, skills and experience. A sponsor must be in your career field to be effective in promoting who you are to other higher level professionals.

These relationships must be built over time and are driven by you. It can take time to find a mentor, whereas coaches can be found by asking a senior professional directly. A mentor will take time and energy to build and show that the relationship will benefit both parties. Finally the sponsor can often take more time, especially if you are still in an early development stage in your career. The first step starts with asking.

This may seem intimidating or formulaic at first, but it is a natural consequence of successful people. To add to the saying “Rome wasn’t built in a day,” it was also definitely not built by a single person. Behind every successful person there are countless people who have helped along the way, whether they are coaches, mentors, sponsors, contemporaries, or friends. The importance of knowing that you are not alone, and that you cannot do it all alone, is the first step in the right direction.

Volunteering, internships and side jobs are a great way to build skills, networks and experience, with the latter allowing you the extra income to build up a savings. To learn more about volunteering opportunities in and around Grand Rapids, you can go here and here for internships.

Nothing is more awkward than a cold email to a loose contact for a recommendation letter. It’s not about being a wanderer or a job nomad, but rather always following your passion and building yourself up. Some jobs will help add to your skill set, others to your network, and most to your experience, while some others are missteps. It’s OK to have a plateau where you gain your bearings and just maintain your career; life isn’t all about work. Life is meant to be lived!

Check out some of these local job boards and see if they pique your interest. If you are searching your mind for who your coach, mentor, or sponsor could be no need to rush. It takes time to build.

StartUp Jobs

City of Grand Rapids Jobs

Ken Miguel-Cipriano is Rapid Growth’s innovation and jobs editor. To reach Ken, you can email ken.miguel.cipriano@gmail.com or follow him on Twitter and Instagram.


Pillow talk: Grand Rapids companies brightly and TR Data Strategy launch home decor business

For anyone who follows the work of the local creative and design firm, brightly, on Facebook, you might have noticed a series of posts in your news feed announcing the launch of a new “side project” called Tyg Décor shortly before Thanksgiving.

Rapid Growth was able to contact Larry Faragalli, the CEO at brightly, to get the lowdown of this new project, which he described as a partnership between brightly, TR Data Strategy, and one of their clients in the fabric and decor industry. 

For the purposes of this interview, questions are being answered by Larry Faragalli, CEO at brightly, and Matt Anderson, Partner at TR Data Strategy.

RGM. What's the new side project that brightly is working on?

Larry: Tyg Décor is a home decor business founded on the idea that accessories can be the star of your home. You don’t need to buy new furniture or repaint a room to change the feel; even something as simple as a well-made pillow can be transformative to a space. We’ve got decadent fabrics, vibrant colors, and a multitude of patterns that are ahead of the average fabric market fashion. We think there’s value in being able to constantly refresh a space with the seasons and so we’re launching the first subscription service for pillows, like Stitch Fix or Birchbox. Subscribe and each quarter and you will be delighted with seasonally fashionable pillows to dress up a room.

RGM: Who else is involved in with this project?

Larry: I learned about the Tyg Décor conceptually while traveling in Palm Springs with Matt Anderson of TR Data Strategy, a data strategy firm we work with both closely and frequently. One of their clients in Connecticut has significant exclusive access to premium fabrics from around the world, and TR Data Strategy believed there was a prime opportunity to create a direct-to-consumer brand in the home decor space.  We both agreed that data driven decisions and strong user experience would be the backbone of delivering the brand online and decided to formalize the arrangement. Through joint investment, both financially and through service contributions, we worked to create a new joint venture business.

RGM: How long have you been working on it?

Matt: We’ve been working on Tyg Décor on and off for most of this year. Funding the business took longer than expected. Then we made half a dozen trips to source fabric, make hundreds of prototypes, dial in the manufacturing and fulfillment processes, and install the technology that makes it all work. And now we’re live, just in time for the holiday shopping season.

RGM: What attracted brightly to this project?

Larry: One of brightly’s core missions is investment in product businesses, whether they’re technology based or not. We’ve invested in a few businesses thus far across several categories that are less consumer facing, and we wanted to dip our toe in the water of the consumer space. We’ve had great experiences working with the folks at TR Data Strategy, and generally love unique businesses that provide some kind of delight or value in a fairly accessible way. I think there’s a lot of possibilities in the category.

RGM: When it comes to the pillows, where does the actual work get done?  (sourcing, sewing, fabric design and shipping)

Matt: Tyg Décor is a distributed company. Our partner in Connecticut spent the better part of five years scouring the globe finding overlooked sources of super premium fabrics, which we now source domestically. Design takes place here and in Connecticut. We cut and sew in a terrific factory just over the border and ship five days a week from Eagle Pass, Texas. And we manage the business right here in Grand Rapids.

RGM: What are your plans for marketing Tyg Décor?

Matt: Home décor is highly visual, engaging, and fun, which makes it a great fit for social sharing. You can find us on Facebook, Instagram, and Pinterest. We’ve been working on partnerships with high profile home design blogs that we look forward to announcing next year. And through the end of the year, we’re giving our friends and family (and their friends and family) the chance to earn free product and other prizes for spreading the word. We’re extending that offer to Rapid Growth readers. You can get started at http://friends.tygdecor.com.

Larry: Outside of the methods Matt mentioned, we’ll be doing a fair share of traditional advertising over time as well. We believe the market is hungry today for a company like Tyg Décor, and we intend to do all the marketing necessary to build a national and international brand

RGM: How big of an opportunity is Tyg Décor? Do you envision adding products beyond pillows?

Matt: Decorative pillows alone is a billion dollar industry in the U.S., but our vision is bigger than pillows. Be on the lookout for other innovative products we plan on launching next year.

RGM: Tell us about the name: Tyg Décor.  Any special significance?

Larry/Matt:We were looking for a name that was fresh, short, memorable, and most importantly, not already taken. When we learned that “Tyg” is Swedish for “fabric”, which is the heart and differentiator of all of our products. It seemed a fitting choice.

Writer: John Rumery, Innovation and Jobs News Editor

Carvers: There's a new butcher in town

There's a new butcher in town.

Or more accurately, there is a new butcher at the Downtown Market.

Carvers: Grand Rapids’ Finest Meats, opened for business Oct. 7, becoming the newest tenant inside the Grand Rapids Downtown Market Hall.

Carvers will feature the traditional products you expect to find in a neighborhood butcher store, plus a little more. Cases will be packed with a variety of high-end meats (beef, pork, poultry, lamb, etc.) at an “approachable price” (more on this later). Beef options will include a full line of 100 percent grass-fed, hormone- and antibiotic-free beef as well as high-end Kobe options. Heritage Kurobota pork, pork belly, unique house-made sausages, and organic, free-range chickens will also be available year-round. 

Carvers too will feature a full-service kitchen with made-from-scratch items, including a $5 burger feature, chicken wings, pastrami and corned-beef sandwiches, and  a full-service deli, where customers can customize their own grab-and-go sandwiches and salad bowls, made to order by deli specialists.

The founder of Carvers is none other than Jeff Butzow, the culinary impresario behind Fish Lads, a Downtown Market anchor.

Between fish mongering and opening his new business, Butzow is very busy but Rapid Growth managed to catch up and ask a few questions about Carvers via email.

With your experience at the market, why is Carver's needed after the previous butcher closed?  Are you going to be doing anything different?

Folks shopping at the Downtown Market have missed the option of having fresh meat, on-demand. We’ve listened to customers for the past several months and put together options that will hopefully satisfy everybody. From a line of grass-fed beef that’s never been treated with antibiotics or hormones to American Wagyu beef to heritage pork and organic chickens, we’re trying to reach consumers who are seeking sustainable and delicious options. We also have a full-service deli that features a full line of nitrate- and nitrite-free lunch meats and charcuterie.

What does "approachable price" mean? 

Because meat products come in greater quantities and are easier to cross-utilize than high-end seafood, we’re able to pass along cost savings to consumers. Our menu features a $5 burger made from high-end beef we grind in house from our steak trimmings. Customers will be able to pick a sausage from the case and get it grilled right then from the kitchen. We know consumers have expressed surprise at some of the prices in the Downtown Market, and we want to show that this is an experience open to anyone regardless of income level.

Are you working with any local (or regional) farms for the meats?

We are proud to be retailers of Otto’s chicken and turkey, from their farm in Middleville. Our pork comes from DeVries in Coopersville, and is excellent. But, like Fish Lads, we’ve strived to reach across the globe to source the very best products for consumers that fit with our commitment to quality and sustainability. For example, our grass-fed beef comes from Australia, and we selected them as our provider because of their ability to consistently provide diverse selections of antibiotic- and hormone-free cattle.

How many jobs will Carvers be "carving" out?

We have added eight new staffers, and been able to create more hours for our Fish Lads crew. We are currently hiring, and encourage anyone interested in joining our growing team to come down and apply.

What are the similarities and differences between Fish Lads and Carvers?

Carvers is essentially an extension of the Fish Lads experience, just meat-centric. The same front-of-house staff that serve customers at Fish Lads will extend their reach down the counter to Carvers. We’ve hired experienced butchers that know their meat and will serve as great resources for customers, whether they’re looking to try out a new cut of meat, or simply want a new recipe to spice up their dining routine. We aim to serve the highest quality products without pretense.
 
For more information about Carvers, you can check out their Facebook page here.

Writer: John Rumery, Innovation and Jobs News Editor

Grand Rapids company designs award-winning app for workforce development

The C2 Group, a Grand Rapids-based web design and development company, has announced the launch of an award-winning  application.

The KentuckianaWorks Career Calculator is a web based, career focused application that  uses a variety of local and national datasets, such as the  Economic Modeling Specialists International, U.S. Census Bureau, Bureau of Labor Statistics, O*NET Web Services, and the Kentucky Center for Education and Workforce Statistics, to make job and career searches easier, faster and more effective. The app was designed by The C2 Group in conjunction with KentuckianaWorks, the career training arm of the Louisville, Kentucky metro government.

The new app helps users such as students, career counselors and adults looking to transition into another career easily search real-time labor data by occupation, education and income. The app translates the data into easy-to-understand visualizations that helps users identify trends and opportunities to make better career and academic decisions.  “This is the centerpiece for a workforce development initiative,” says Brian Beaupied, marketing communications manager at The C2 Group.

In June, the U.S. Conference of Mayors recognized KentuckianaWorks, the city of Louisville, and Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer with a 2016 National Education Pathways with a Purpose Award and, with it, a $100,000 grant based on the success of the career calculator.

Beaupied says The C2 Group has worked extensively in higher education and was chosen for the project after submitting a request for proposal.

The C2 Group is a full-service web development company, designs and builds web, mobile, and custom application. For more information on the company you can view their website here.

Writer: John Rumery, Innovation and Jobs News Editor
 

Beer and business: GRCC's Fountain Hill Brewery responds to industry's growing hiring needs

Beer City needs beer employees — and who better to provide high quality education and training for our metropolis’s brewing and food operations than Grand Rapids Community College and the Secchia Institute for Culinary Education?

The Craft Brewing, Packaging and Service Operations Certificate is the school’s response to the industry’s growing hiring needs that go beyond solely understanding the brewing process and includes mastering the entire brewery operation that is needed to run a successful business.

The certificate program includes fieldwork experiences and an internship at a brewery or brewing-related operation. Course topics include brewing, fermentation principles, packaging, labeling, merchandising, marketing and operations management — including laws and tax regulations.

Amy Koning, Associate Dean of Operations, says industry partners, including many of the largest brewers in the city, were the catalysts for the program at a time it became apparent that the rapid growth of the industry and the demands of the job market far exceeded the supply of trained workers. With a highly successful culinary arts program that is routinely named one of the best in the country and established connections with the restaurant industry, GRCC’s Secchia Institute for Culinary Education was a logical place to design and offer a program.

The centerpiece of the Craft Brewing, Packaging and Service Operations Certificate is a fully functional brewpub, The Fountain Hill Brewery, which is operated by students enrolled in the program which began in the summer of 2016.  “The brewpub is a lab, just like the Heritage Restaurant,” Koning says, referring to a restaurant run by culinary students. “Students are in class when they are brewing and serving when the brewpub is open.”

The program is two semesters long and  includes an internship for completion. Koning says the next cohort is full, with 18 students enrolled. There is currently one full-time instructor and two part-time faculty serving in the program.

The Fountain Hill Brewery is open to the public but has limited hours.

Hours of operation are:

5:30-7:30 p.m. on the following Thursdays/Fridays

Fall 2016
  • September 22-23, 29-30
  • October 6-7, 27-28
  • November 3-4, 10-11, 17-18
  • December 1-2
Winter 2017:
  • January 19-20, 26-27
  • February 2-3, 9-10
  • March 16-17, 23-24, 30-31
  • April 6, 13-14

Writer: John Rumery, Innovation and Job News Editor

Help wanted: Must be interested in making a difference in the community

Are you interested in helping to end homelessness in Grand Rapids? How about making sure the West Michigan business community grows and local neighborhoods thrive? Or being in a classroom and shaping the next generation of citizens?

If any of these descriptions describe you, check out these three organizations that have openings for jobs that can make a significant impact in the community and in the lives of people throughout our area.

1. Well House is growing and looking for a Chief Operating Officer.

If you interested in being an agent of change in the community and being part of an organization that is tackling the issue of homelessness in an innovative way, Well House Executive Director Tami Vandenberg has the job for you.
 
“This is an incredible opportunity to help shape the future of Well House and the movement we are building to change the conversation around homelessness in our community,” Vandenberg says. “This position will interact with a wide cross-section of the city including people living on the street, elected officials, funders and service providers. A rare opportunity to have lasting impact in people's lives as well as the city's housing future."

For more information, you can view the application here and the Well House website here.

2. The Grand Rapids Area Chamber of Commerce has two new leadership positions posted.

If you are  interested in economic development and being part of the team that has significant impact on West Michigan’s business growth and success, the Grand Rapids Area Chamber of Commerce has recently announced  two new opportunities to join its senior leadership team. The two available positions are Vice President of Talent Development and Vice President of Marketing & Communications.

You can view the jobs here and learn more about the Chamber here

3. The GVSU Charter School Portfolio has multiple job openings in both east and west Michigan

If education, teaching and learning is your passion, Erin Abel has a series of job openings in the GVSU Charter School Portfolio that might be what you are looking for. “We’re the first accredited charter authorizer in the nation,” Abel notes. Beyond the intrinsic value of working in education, Abel explains there are significant professional and personal development opportunities. “What you get working at a GVSU charter school: M.Ed tuition reimbursement, free professional development, a statewide support network, and career satisfaction,” Abel says.

You can view the employment opportunities through the GVSU Charter Portfolio here.

If you’re looking for a new career or position, keep an eye on our jobs and innovation section. Rapid Growth will be highlighting other interesting jobs across many sectors in the upcoming months.

Writer: John Rumery, Innovation and Jobs News Editor

Women of the web: Girl Develop It to support, grow community of female programmers in West Michigan

Becky VandenBout and Shelby Tieche make things happen -- both at work and in the community.

VandenBout is a freelance software developer and Tieche is a front end developer at BizStream. They use code to make things for a living.

They are now using coding to build and support a community of women programmers in West Michigan as co-founders of the Girl Develop It (GDI) Grand Rapids chapter.

GDI is a national nonprofit organization that exists to provide affordable and accessible programs to women who want to learn web and software development through hands-on instruction. GDI targets women 18 years and older who are interested in exploring a career in software or are looking for a career change. Classes range from introductory to advance level software development skills.

Tieche says her motivation to spend her energies on starting the chapter is simple. “I am passionate about code, and being a female in the industry I want to encourage women to make a career in coding,” she explains. 

The local chapter will reflect the interests of the members, says Tieche, as they will have the freedom to create different courses -- all based on listening to the local members. “We will mold it to what the community wants,” Tieche says.

Tieche recommends you sign up for their email list to receive more information on how to become involved with GDI GR by filling out this form. You will then be sent more information based on the interests you identify, as well as newsletters and reminders for future classes and meetups.

To get started, the first meetup is scheduled for Wednesday, September 14th from 6:00pm-8:00pm at The Factory downtown and will be focused on everything GDI, as well as what the vision and goals are for the Grand Rapids chapter. They will also be announcing the schedule for upcoming classes and social events as well. These meetups will be held every second Wednesday of the month.

To RSVP to this meetup, check out the Meetup page at https://www.meetup.com/Girl-Develop-It-Grand-Rapids/events/233536292/.

Writer: John Rumery, Innovation and Jobs News Editor

GR's Varsity News Network adds founder of The North Face to strategic advisory board

Grand Rapids-based Varsity News Network (VNN) has announced that Kenneth “Hap” Klopp, founder of The North Face, will be joining VNN’s strategic advisory board effective immediately.
 
Klopp is the founder of the outdoor brand The North Face and served as the CEO for 25 years. In addition to his role at VNN, Klopp is currently an Operating Partner and Advisor at VO2 Partners.
 
Ryan Vaughn, VNN founder, says that adding Klopp to the advisory board is an important chapter in the story of the growing news network, which offers hyperlocal high school sports content to millions of readers across the country.
 
Vaughn explains the relationship with Klopp began about two years ago through an introduction from a VNN investor. At that time, Vaughn says Klopp was intrigued by VNN but took a wait­-and-­see approach to the startup. “He has a sports background and an appreciation for the difficulty for what we are doing,” Vaughn says. “He has seen other companies trying to consolidate the fragmented high school market and has seen them fail.”
 
However, after VNN continued to grow, hitting business milestones and attracting investors, Vaughn was able to make a successful pitch for Klopp to join his advisory board. ”He knows people throughout the sports industry, has many contacts in the media and has a lengthy background in building startups,” Vaughn notes of the new board member.
 
Besides Klopp’s incredible network and experience, Vaughn notes it is his expertise in branding where he might have his biggest impact on VNN. “It’s a big commitment on his part and an important part of the the evolution of VNN,” he says. “As we have grown, we’ve figured out many things about our business. Now we are growing from a startup to a company, and in the next few years we will be scaling to build a national consumer brand.”
 
As the industry’s first comprehensive communication platform, VNN is the exclusive web/mobile platform for more than 10 percent of all U.S. high school athletic communities, reaching over 7 million passionate fans across 40-plus states (adding 8,000 fans daily) with exclusive, hyperlocal high school sports content. To learn more about VNN, you can visit their site here.
 
Writer: John Rumery, Innovation and Jobs News Editor

Grand Rapids business makes list of 5,000 fastest growing companies in the U.S.

Final Jeopardy question.

This local, women-owned company was established in 2012. It employs 14 people and recently purchased a new office building in the North Monroe business district. In the recent release of the 2016 Inc. 5,000 fastest growing companies in the U.S, they were listed as number 447.

[ queue final Jeopardy music ]

What is Creative Studio Promotions?

Correct you are.

Unless you are one of their customers or are the promotional product industry, this would be a question worthy of final Jeopardy -- primarily because Creative Studio Promotions tends to fly under the radar and has little need for advertising, instead relying on their reputation in the industry. This, clearly, has worked, and Inc. calls it one of the "superheroes of the U.S. economy."
 
Ann Vidro, co-founder, says her business’s success is the direct result of their ability to be one of the few companies in the industry to be large enough to handle the entirety of a promotional campaign. “We can handle any promotional campaign from start to finish,” she explains. “That is very unique and sets us apart.”

Besides providing strategic advice in the early stages of a promotional campaign, Vidro says her company can design promotional goods, print t-shirts and bags, provide embroidery services, warehouse and ship products, and manage online stores for their clients’ branded merchandise. 

Creative Studio Promotions’ new building is located at 1168 Ionia NW. You can visit their website here.

Writer: John Rumery, Innovation and Jobs News Editor
 

Sugar High: D'Arts Donut Shop to celebrate opening in Eastown next week

D’Arts Donut Shop is the newest culinary attraction in Eastown, with the shop set to debut its storefront during a soft launch the week of August 22 at 1444 Lake Drive.

The specialty donut shop cut its teeth as a food truck in 2015, building its customer base and reputation that made the move to a brick and mortar seamless. “Opening a storefront was always part of the masterplan” says founder Adam Oulette. ”We knew if we built a following, success would come at a permanent location.”

As befits a business in Eastown, D’Arts will be unique and eclectic. The donuts will be made using a family recipe and will be yeast risen. The sweets will be “more like a bread dough” says Oulette, who notes they do not use any pre-made mixes as all the donuts will be made from scratch.

The plan will be to offer a rotating menu of 10 to 13 donut flavors daily, Madcap brewed coffee and nitro cold brew, and home-style breakfast and lunch options, which will always feature….donuts. “Everything will have a donut base” says Oulette. “Our sandwiches will be made on sliced donuts.”

The Lake Drive storefront features a 49-seat cafe setting with solar panels that power the radiant floor heating to provide heat in the winter and hot water in the summer; a mix of LED, natural light, and solar tubes; and a rustic industrial interior with high top and bar seating plus free Wi-Fi.

D’Arts will grow from its two original employees to a staff of 16. A larger kitchen to will be able to accommodate the wedding and private event catering side of the business.

For more information, you can visit their site here.

Writer: John Rumery, Innovation and Jobs News Editor

'Good Neighbor Orientation' connects GVSU students to West Side neighborhoods

The common narrative is as old as the hills. Students start school, move into neighborhood rentals, party, go to class, party, finish the semester, and go home. Students come and go and often get a bad rap that they could care less about getting involved or about getting to know longtime residences, appreciating the neighborhood’s history or supporting the local businesses.

Not so fast.

For many Grand Valley State University students, when they attend their student orientation on August 25,  they will have an opportunity for a very unique learning opportunity: an opportunity to totally flip that narrative and participate in an ongoing dialogue on what it means to be a good neighbor.

Thanks to an invitation from GVSU to participate in the student orientation program, the WestSide Collaborative, two local neighborhood associations and several  local nonprofits will share with students a little history of the West Side and provide encouragement and simple ways to get involved in the community outside of GVSU as part of a program called the “Good Neighbor Orientation.”

Sergio Cira-Reyes, project director at the WestSide Collaborative, says the orientation is an important initiative meant to engage students and help better integrate them into the local neighborhoods.  “The narrative has always been that students are coming into the community and displacing long time residents,” he says. Instead, Cira-Reyes wants to inspire students to learn more about the West Side, engage them in serious discussions about economic development and gentrification, and ultimately help them discover their voice so they can speak up and express their opinions. “We want students to be part of this community and they should be part of the discussion,” he says. “We see them as future leaders in our neighborhoods.”
 
This event comes at a particularly crucial time, with “mom ‘n pop” shops giving way to larger developments and rents continually rising. In an article Rapid Growth published late last year, Andrew Sisson, of the WestSide Collaborative, explains the tension behind the changes occurring on the West Side.
 
“Currently the market rate for a studio apartment is about $1,000 a month,” Sisson says in that article. “That’s bringing in wealthier residents, and that means people living here are being forced out. About 40 percent of those living in these neighborhoods have incomes below the poverty level. People with children are having a hard time renting, because kids are hard on a house and the new owners don’t want to rent to them. And those who lost their houses in 2008 to foreclosure — the majority of those were sold to investors with cash, buying up single family housing and turning them into rental homes.”

During the orientation students will listen to peers who live and work in the West Side and be pitched on different ways to get involved.  There will also be a table in the back with representatives from West Side organizations to welcome students to the community and provide background information on their work. The program will end with a walking tour of the West Side with specific stops at local organizations and dinner.

Ultimately, Cira-Reyes hopes that students will begin to understand their impact on the West Side community and be inspired to get involved and make a difference.

The 'Good Neighbor Orientation' will take place from 7-9pm at GVSU's downtown campus on August 25 . For more information, including how to register, please go here.

Writer: John Rumery, Innovation and Jobs News Editor

How the business community is unlocking the potential of The Port of Muskegon

The Port of Muskegon is West Michigan’s largest, natural deepwater port, and according to a recent economic impact report, with proper development, marketing and promotion,  it has the potential to create 1,700 jobs and more than $280 million in annual economic activity that reaches throughout West Michigan.

That was the gist of Port Day, an event organized and hosted by the West Michigan Shoreline Regional Development Commission (WMSRDC),  the Muskegon County Port Advisory Committee and the West Michigan Prosperity Alliance (WMPA) with the intention to introduce the port’s potential to local and regional stakeholders and build a collaborative network in order to advance the vision of the port becoming a multi-modal regional logistics hub and capturing the economic value forecasted in the report.

“There are a lot of moving parts” before this vision can become a reality, says WMSRDC Executive Director Erin Kuhn, but she is very optimistic that the port has the potential to be a significant economic engine for West Michigan. “The greater community does not realize the assets around Muskegon Lake and the port,” Kuhn says. “We have access to shipping, an airport, rail and the highways.  And the commercial capacities are often underutilized.”

Kuhn notes the recent interest in the Port of Muskegon is directly related to the closing of the Consumers Energy plant in Muskegon. In order to have the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers continue to dredge the channel, the tonnage of coal that was shipped for use by Consumers Energy would be need to be replaced. To address this, the local business community came together and began asking questions: How do they diversify? How do they overcome this issue?

The answer quickly became evident: cooperation. Diversifying the use of the port would require the coordination of the private sector and local, regional, state, and federal governments.

When the WMPA (an organization that was formed in January 2014 as part of Gov. Rick Snyder’s Regional Prosperity Initiative) issued a call for projects in October 2014, a proposal was created by local leaders, and the  Port of Muskegon was selected as the number one regional project.

With this recognition, the project was moved from a local level to a regional one, and The West Michigan Shoreline Regional Development Commission took a lead role in securing state and federal grants and is developing a plan to advance the port as a regional logistics hub.

For more information about this initiative please visit http://wmsrdc.org/port-day.

The West Michigan Shoreline Regional Development Commission is a planning and development agency serving 120 local governments from Lake, Mason, Muskegon, Newaygo and Oceana Counties. The Commission works to foster regional development in West Michigan through various services and programs.
 
Writer: John Rumery, Innovation and Jobs News Editor
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