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Development News

Unexpected duo demolishes stereotypes with their handy-work


As West Michigan’s housing market continues its frenzy of home sales, sellers are anxious to make repairs and improvements that ensure they get top dollar. Handywoman, Kate Kaminski, and handyman, Darius Williams, are two locals doing the work.

Kaminski grew up with tools in her hands — her father and grandfather were both builders, so she found plenty of tools around. While other fathers might object to their daughters playing with saws, hammers, nuts, and bolts, Kaminski’s dad encouraged her inclinations.

“My dad taught me everything. He never told me ‘No,’ that I couldn’t do something,” she says. “I remember as a kid, I’d go in quietly, take the tools, some nails, and go out and build forts and stuff. Dad would be at the window, watching what I was doing, making sure I was okay, but never stopped me.”

After finishing a bachelor of fine arts that focused on sculpture, Kaminski operated a Boyne City gallery shop that featured her own jewelry as well as work by local and international artists. As a next step, she moved to New Hampshire. When her parents disclosed that her father was in the last stages of cancer, she offered to come back to the Grand Rapids area to help. Her mother suggested she move into her grandmother’s empty house and fix it up so they could put it on the market.

“When the Realtor that my mom chose saw what I could do, she told me, ‘I can keep you really busy.’ I thought about it a little bit, decided I could use some work, and it kind of took off from there,” Kaminski says. “We do all that little handy stuff, pound a nail here, put up a door there.”

Work took off so well that Kaminski brought another person on board to help. Darius Williams rounds out Kaminski’s skill-set quite nicely. As a team, they can tackle a very wide range of home fix-it and remodel projects. They are staying so busy that Kaminski has plans to hire a third team member in the spring.

“We do painting, sanding, trim work, laying floors, and tile. We just did some concrete work in a basement,” Kaminski says. “Darius has the same kind of experience that I do. He can do a little plumbing and electrical — he’s a little more knowledgeable than I am with those.”

The duo refers any major or complex electrical and plumbing chores to technicians licensed in those trades.

When Kaminski and Williams knock on a door, some customers are surprised to be face-to-face with a white woman and African-American man. However, once they see their level of expertise, the surprise turns to gratitude and stereotypes dissolve.

“The clients I have been working with have been pretty cool. Most of them are surprised when I come in through the door. On one job, it was so funny watching peoples’ expressions. We kind of surprise them. Once we start doing the work, we get compliments,” Kaminski says. “I’m sure I probably don’t look like the typical handyperson, which kind of goes along with Darius, too.”

Don’t try to find Kaminski online or via social media. She’s too busy working — and finds plenty of work by word-of-mouth.

“I like that every day is different, that I am not in an office building. If I had to sit in front of a computer all day, I’d be drooling on the keyboard,” she says. “I love the different challenges to fix something, improve something. I love seeing the outcome. It’s almost instant gratification.”

If you’d like to get in touch with Kaminski or WIlliams, email the RGM development news editor, Estelle.Slootmaker@gmail.com.

Photo courtesy Kate Kaminski.

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