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Grand Rapids Comic Con: Cosplay in the city

If suddenly you stumble upon a superhero or a furry creature as you walk about downtown this weekend, have no fear because it is the sign that Grand Rapids Comic Con is back in town.

And, just like with every passing year that Comic Con is celebrated here in our city, it just keeps getting bigger and bigger.

This year, in addition to the 100,000-square-foot DeVos Play vending hall, which will be host to scores of small businesses devoted to the art of the comic and illustrated novel, Grand Rapids Comic Con is also hosting a car show, a film festival, an art show, an anime screening room, a pop-up museum, and more than 100-plus hours of programming crammed into one weekend. 

More than 25 comic artist guests will be appearing this year, including Kevin Eastman, the co-creator of the “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles;” Jae Lee of “Batman/Superman;” and “Ren and Stimpy” creative writer/director Bob Camp.

In addition, there is a “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles” (1990) cast reunion, as well as more than a dozen live action celebrities from popular shows, like Wil Traval from “Jessica Jones,” Denise Crosby of “The Walking Dead,” Bruno Gunn of “The Hunger Games: Catching Fire,” and Conrad Brooks -- the last surviving cast member from “Plan 9 From Outer Space.”

For a complete look at all of the events scheduled to take place in Grand Rapids this weekend, please visit www.grcomiccon.com for all the details including the special admission offers. 

Grand Raggidy Roller Derby vs. The World: Plus a superhero afterparty

There are only a handful of home game matches left for this year for our Grand Raggidy Roller Derby. 

This weekend, our girls hit the rink at Grandville’s Rivertown Sports to take on the Brighton Roller Dollz of Brighton, Michigan and Killamazoo Derby Darlins’ from Kalamazoo, Michigan.

This double header starts off with our junior team, the Grand Raggidy Attack, going up against the Brighton Roller Dollz’s C and B teams. If you are a betting person, then you will be happy to know that the numbers have been crunched and our Attack team is favored heavily with a 94 percent rating to win this match. The last time these two teams went up against each other was in 2014, and we beat them at that time.

After the Attack’s match is the main event with our Grand Raggidy’s All Stars taking on the Killamazoo Derby Darlins’. And while we have a history of playing Killamazoo often, it has been a year since we last saw these two popular teams from our region of the state go head to head in the rink. 

Statisticians rank the Grand Raggidy favorably to also win this game with a 90 percent chance of victory. In layman’s terms, this matchup has the predictable potential to become a high stakes scoring event, with our All Stars landing 34 to every 19 points Killamazoo scores.

In honor of Grand Rapids Comic Con, this year’s roller derby match is tipping its hat with a Comic Con themed night, so be sure to dress up as your favorite comic book character. 

Stop by the bomb-squad table and pick up a few comic-related props to have your photo taken at the booth. And, as always, the girls will have plenty of fun-filled activities for adults and kids to enjoy while our two teams seek to bring home a victory.

Immediately after, the girls will invite the visiting teams, along with their fans, to join them at the Rezervior Lounge (1418 Plainfield NE) for their afterparty, which this time is following the Comic Con theme into the late night with a dance floor full of roller derby rowdies unlike any other event in our city. 

Those attending the afterparty in their favorite cosplay costume are free to enter the costume contest for a chance to win some terrific prizes!

Admission: Ages 6-11 - $8, Ages 12 and over - $12 prior to game day or $15 at the door

Grand Rapids Feminist Film Fest: Feminism for all ages; an inclusive look at gender

For the third annual Grand Rapids Feminist Film Fest (GRFFF), the organizers will be offering so much more than just a chance to screen more than 40 short films as a part of their annual event at Wealthy Theatre.

This year, the upgrades include more seminars and workshops devoted to all things cinema -- and this year they will be programming two blocks of films that are free of triggers that could set off children. This is a huge upgrade for families who want to attend but might have concerns about the content of some of the films being screened this year. These blocks of films can be located on their schedule and fall earlier in the day, with evenings being reserved for more adult themed programming. 

This year’s programming came about after the festival committee screened hundreds of submissions from all over the world, including France, Thailand, Sweden, Korea, Germany, and the United States. You can see a complete list and synopsis of all the films screening this year at the GRFFF website.
All films at the GRFFF are 20 minutes or less in length and and will be screened in Wealthy Theatre’s main auditorium, with the Dirk Koning Micro-Cinema and the Annex reserved for the many panels and workshops that include topics like “Dissecting Feminist Films,” “Gender Performance: CIS Playing LGBTQ,” and my favorite, “Analyzing Beyonce's Lemonade: black feminism and pop music” with Breannah Alexander, founder of women reVamped. For all the workshop and panels, visit this link for all the details on the topics covered and guest speakers.

All of the films and events at the GRFFF are free, and this is in part due to the generous sponsorship of our area organizations and businesses.  

Admission: Free

Dietrich Klinge: American debut at Meijer Gardens

One of the art world’s most elusive of modern sculptors will be making his United States speaking debut at our Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park. Up until now, the chance to hear artist Dietrich Klinge has been a rare treat and something that has never happened in the U.S. until now. 

Meijer Gardens, which owns numerous graphic works and models by Klinge, will be the setting for this special lecture. Along with the Grosser Trefree sculpture, Meijer Gardens is proud to showcase two outdoor bronzes in the permanent collection from Klinge. 

Many may be familiar with his colossal Model for Big Sculpture II (2004), a gift from Fred and Lena Meijer, as it is often the first piece of art that greets visitors at the edge of the Tassell English and Perennial Bulb Garden right at the main entrance. Meijer Gardens recently added Stele Garuge (2000) to the Woodland Shade Garden as a gift to the East Beltline collection from Hank and Liesel Meijer.

Since this is Klinge first speaking engagement in the U.S., we feel especially fortunate that he has selected Meijer Gardens for this intimate and personal talk to take place. Joining Klinge on stage will be Joseph Becherer, Chief Curator and Vice President of Collections and Exhibitions at Meijer Gardens.

An Evening with Dietrich Klinge is a part of the annual Charles Schoenknecht & Ward Paul Sculpture Lecture series.

Admission: Free for members, and complimentary with paid admission for non-members

The Alchemist Cookbook: Indie spirit is contemporary art

Ever since the democratization of digital filmmaking tools, Grand Rapids has been flush with creative minds showcasing their visions via our local screens. 

On Friday, Grand Rapids’ filmmaker Joel Potrykus (“Buzzard,” “Ape”) will debut locally his latest film, “The Alchemist Cookbook,” at the Urban Institute for Contemporary Arts for a two-week run.

This film arrives here after being invited as an official selection at the 2016 South by Southwest Film Festival.

“The Alchemist Cookbook” is the story about a young outcast, Sean, who has isolated himself in a trailer in the woods, setting out on alchemic pursuits with his cat Kaspar as his sole companion. 

Filled with disdain for authority, he's fled the daily grind and holed up in the wilderness, escaping a society that has no place for him. But when he turns from chemistry to black magic to crack nature's secret, things go awry and he awakens something far more sinister and dangerous.

The film features a black cast and is a break from Potrykus’ previous trilogy of films which all featured primarily caucasian actors. “The Alchemist Cookbook” feature stands out in his filmography for its director’s ability to deliver on the psychological horror film genre while still maintaining his indie street cred with the critics and his fans.

Admission: UICA members:$4, public: $8

Tunde Olaniran + ConvoTronics + Britney Stoney: Michigan's triple play day

A few weeks ago we featured the Blue Bridge Music Festival because we wanted to bring to light not only the many acts that would be performing but to showcase this region’s and our state’s ability to produce so much wonderful talent via the music labels popping up here.

One such label, Hot Capicola Records, will present a music showcase of three of its acts at the Pyramid Scheme. It is shaping up to be a dream ticket for your Friday night out on the town.

The headliner on Friday is Tunde Olaniran, a native of Flint, Michigan who has been described by Rolling Stone Magazine as one of the 10 new artists you need to know.  With an electronic beat and lyrics richly alive with a social consciousness, Olaniran has been described by Rolling Stone as “a self-sustaining multi-disciplinary force that can sing empowerment anthems with passion, spin party raps with confidence and humor, and produce his own dance tracks. He also choreographs his performances, which often involve costumed dancers moving in unison to the beat.”

Also performing is Grand Rapids’ ConvoTronics — a hip hop act compared to Wu-Tang, Beastie Boys and Slaughter House who traveled on the Vans Warped Tour Bring it Back Stage — and Britney Stoney — a producer, singer, songwriter, and guitarist born and raised in Detroit. Stoney is a 2014 Kresge Foundation music fellow. 

To read more about the launch of Hot Capicola Records, be sure to check out John Sinkevics look at the new label via Local Spins.

Admission: $10 in advance. 

Women Who Write Author Showcase: Be there for our Sistas

Search any major city for a book event and you will be blown away at how many are out there. But when you seek to narrow your focus to other areas of diversity that include women, you might be surprised at how few there really are.. 

Lucky for us, we are doing our part locally by way of our Hook a Sista Up (HASU) 2nd annual Women Who Write Author Showcase, which returns to the south side’s Kroc Center on Saturday, Oct. 15.

This unique community event follows HASU’s mission to help area women authors gain visibility and recognition in their community.

This literary showcase enables folks hoping to connect with local women authors and writers to interact with the more than 15 authors scheduled to appear this year. 

In addition, this year HASU presents a writer’s workshop before the marketplace opens.

The workshop titled “Getting Going, Getting Started,” will be led by author Anna J. Small Roseboro, who will share actionable ideas for budding writers or those simply wanting to know more about storytelling to get started on your new manuscript. 

Small Roseboro is a published author and veteran teacher whose workshop will help writers focus on their audience and personal goals enabling them to take those confident steps towards completing a work of fiction or non-fiction. You must pre-register for this workshop event and the cost is $20. 

Hook a Sista Up’s mission is to help women entrepreneurs by bringing awareness to their businesses, promoting their work and providing a supportive relationship with other women entrepreneurs as they launch and sustain their businesses through collaboration and mentorship.

Admission:  Showcase free, workshop $20.

Fork Fest: Carving delicious dialogue

The 2016 Local First 6th annual Fork Fest, presented by Brewery Vivant, has so many delicious reasons why you should attend this year, but it is the chance to see a live demonstration unlike anything I have ever witnessed at a food-themed event that is sure to be the talk of the town the following morning. 

While this event will feature dozens of food and beverage providers from our region (see list below), as well as great music from returning act Fauxgrass, it is the butchering demonstration that has my interest.

Louise Earl Butcher — which is provide this butchering demonstration — believes in sourcing its meats from area farms as much as its possible and ensures the quality of their offerings by insisting on visiting those area farms to ensure they uphold the standards their clients have come to enjoy.  Owner Matt Smith hopes that this Fork Fest butcher demonstration will enable guests to connect to the food system in a meaningful manner by creating community dialogue about how our current system works or doesn’t. 

Fork Fest is a popular event, as it enables the hundreds of the public who attend each year to directly talk to the food entrepreneurs who play key roles in our local food system. The addition of a live butcher demonstration adds another critically important layer to the education opportunities of this wildly popular event.

“Food is such a communal thing; it’s something that naturally brings people together,” says Elissa Hillary, Executive Director of Local First. “Fork Fest expands on this bond. It builds our connection to place, contributes to the uniqueness of our community, gives people the opportunity to see our agricultural abundance, and makes it easy to support local food entrepreneurs.” 

With each paid admission you get to sample a diverse array of food and non-alcoholic beverages from Local First’s partner organizations. If you would like to imbibe an adult beverages, those are available for purchase, including options like Brewery Vivant’s Pumpkin Tart and other of their craft brew favorites, wines from Fenn Valley, and crisp Vander Mill Cider.

Area businesses participating this year include:

Black Heron
Brewery Vivant
Byron Center Meats
CitySen Lounge
Cultured Love
Daddy Pete's BBQ
Donkey Taqueria
Essence Restaurant Group
Fenn Valley Vineyards
Furniture City Creamery
GB Russo
Gilmore Catering
Grand Rapids Cheesecake Company
The Grilling Company
Heffron Farms
Herb & Fire Pizzeria
Irie Jamaican
Lindo Mexico
Louise Earl Butcher
Love's Ice Cream
Madcap Coffee
Malamiah Juice Bar
Masen James Bakery
Nutcase Vegan Meats
Paul's Mom's Cookies
Pietro's Italian Restaurant
Redwater Restaurant Group
Riverside Hostdogs
The Score
Slow Food West Michigan 
Supermercado Mexico
Terra GR
Twisted Rooster
Uccello's Ristorante
The Winchester

Adult beverages available for purchase: 

Brewery Vivant
Long Road Distillery
Fenn Valley Vineyards
Vander Mill Cider

Admission: $30 in advance, $35 at the door

Pulaski Days: Delicious, red, and a good dance beat

There are lots of ways you can celebrate Pulaski Days this year in Grand Rapids.

For starters, there is always the family-friendly Pulaski Days Parade, where not only will the Polish royalty be out en masse, but many organizations and causes loosely associated with this festive annual event will be in the streets celebrating this beloved festival. 

This year’s Pulaski Days Parade begins at 11 a.m. and marches down Michigan Street from College to Diamond Avenue. Immediately after the parade, fans can continue their celebration by landing at the Sixth Street Hall (649 Sixth St. NW), where the 2016 Pulaski Awards will be handed out. 

And if parades are not your jam, no worries since our local halls will be open all weekend to the public, which is invited to join in on this celebration of Polish culture by sampling the many diverse and handmade food dishes presented alongside a cold beer with plenty of live bands cranking out Polish dance music.

And should the “polka” get you in trouble on one of these festive nights, then head out for redemption on Sunday to John Ball Park’s bandshell, where the annual Polka Mass will take place at 11 a.m. complete with a lively music-filled Catholic Mass with celebrant Fr. Pat Grile. If it should rain on Sunday, the Polka Mass moves to the Knights of Columbus (1140 Muskegon Ave NW) at 11:15 a.m.

As an added bonus, if you are worried about driving from hall to hall during the evening hours, don’t fret: Pulaski Days offers three distinct shuttle services to suit your adventurous spirit. On Friday and Saturday these shuttles are offered from 7 p.m. to midnight courtesy of Executive Coach Service and Rockford Construction. See the website for shuttle locations and routes. http://www.pulaskidays.org/

All told, there are 14 Polish Halls participating in this year’s Pulaski Days’ epic event, so there are no excuses not to roll out the barrel and have a barrel full of fun. (Burp.) 

Admission: Free

Escanaba in da Moonlight: Yooper horror story on stage

Opening Friday, Oct. 7, 8 p.m. (runs through Oct. 16)
The University Wits, a local theatrical troupe started in 2014, will kick off their 2016 - 2017 season with what they bill as a “Michigan horror story.”

No, they are not adapting the Evil Dead film series for the stage as others have done over the years. The University Wits’s Michigan horror story is “Escanaba in da Moonlight” written by Chelsea, Michigan native Jeff Daniels.

Wait a minute, you say, I do not recall Jeff Daniels’ story being a horror flick.

Well, it is and it isn’t depending on who you talk to about the play’s premise (that would later go on to become a film). 

The story revolves around the tight and competitive Soady family clan who have gathered for the opening day of deer season at their family's Upper Peninsula camp. 

But the horror begins for this clan when the 35-year-old Reuben Soady is not able to bag a buck, making him the oldest Soady in the history of the family not to kill a deer during deer season’s familia pressure-filled opening day.  

This hilarious tale is a perfect kick-off event for the University Wits since this play brings so much life, laughter, and even a touch of suspense to this heart-felt theatrical script that offers powerful insights into the hunting culture to Michigan. How Reuben gets out of this pickle is best left to the actors on stage to reveal at Dog Story Theatre

Admission: $17 ($12 student rush tickets available one hour before performance with valid student ID) 

MODUL8: Happy first anniversary

It is hard to believe that just a year ago Rapid Growth’s G-Sync sat down with the producers of MODUL8 to discuss what they were hoping to do with their series that debuted at the intimate event space at Bar Divani on Ionia Avenue. 

What made this group of music-focused DJs work so well over the last year as they popped from venue to venue, building an audience along the way, was how committed they were to creating experiences for which music wasn’t the only thing that drove the night. These events explored other forms of art could be harnessed to deepen the creative spirits they hoped to launch, with each edition featuring visual artists and (sometimes) local vendors being introduced as it felt appropriate to the spaces they inhabited. 

Needless to say, this is how you not only build an audience but how you educate a local audience about a style of music culture that has had many starts and stops over the last three decades I have been in Grand Rapids. 

MODUL8 describes themselves as a collective of local independent artists aiming to expand local knowledge on this culture through the sharing of underground music and the arts. They have even been expanding a bit over the year as they invite others to join us from other cities on this journey.

On Friday night they celebrate their first anniversary by setting up shop at The Pyramid Scheme for a night of music and art with Chicago’s Justin Long (Hugo Ball, Smartbar) and Detroit’s (and former Grand Rapidian) SuperDre (Bass Candi, Soulful Underground, just dreams) will share the stage with MODUL8’s resident DJs Nešto and Sylock.

Artists on display this time include Hugo Claudin and Esan Sommersell with MODUL8 resident artists Elena Solis and George Eberhardt also featured. 

While there are a lot of dance events in the city, MODUL8 has not just risen above the rest in a beautiful fashion, but in doing so elevated our entire city’s music counter-culture through their contribution over this last year. Dress to impress but also plan to sweat. These events are made for movement, not posing while staring into your phone. 

Admission: 21+ only, $10 advance / $15 day of show

Project : Stories that change the culture

What began as a YouTube project has grown to become a new documentary, “Project Ñ,” that is beginning to make its rounds to cities around the nation.  “Project Ñ” makes a stop in Grand Rapids on Monday, Oct. 10 at Grand Valley State University’s Charles W. Loosemore Auditorium (401 W. Fulton St.) as a part of their national tour. (Ñ is pronounced “En-Yeah”)

Built around personal interviews, “Project Ñ” seeks to give voice to the 16 million (and growing) American/U.S. born Latinx with parents from a Spanish-speaking country. It addresses the gaps that can occur in the lives of Latinx individuals whose identity is rooted in but with various degrees of cultural duality. 

The film is the embodiment of a new social media driven movement that seeks to embolden the Latinx people of our nation, but hopes to eradicate the stigma of misinformation about Latinx culture.

Looking at not just race but also at place, the film harnesses the power of Radical Cultural Self-Awareness — a present-moment introspection of our culture, identity and self. 

In addition to the screening, Denise Soler Cox, a first-time filmmaker who created this documentary with the Oscar-nominated documentary veteran Henry Ansbacher, will be attending the Grand Rapids’ “Project Ñ” screening and conducting a short talk on the project’s history and impact-for-good possibilities. 

Solar Cox’s project seeks to empower those Latinx voices of our community who identify as Ñ, as well as lift up a nation via the diverse stories she has captured here. It is an insightful documentary full of positive and inspiring narratives about the Latinx experience in our modern society. 

Since many Latinx of our nation fall under the scope of “Project Ñ” and are defined as having two distinct cultures — one rooted in home life and the other in society — this documentary brings to light and celebrates through storytelling the many aspects of this dual culture that should make those both the Latinx and non-Latinx proud. 

The event is organized by a partnership of the Hispanic Center of Western Michigan, Latino Community Coalition and Downtown Grand Rapids Inc.

Admission: Free

ArtPrize Top 20 and Disco Brunch ft. Pontchartrain: Get down(town)

Sunday, Oct. 2, 1 p.m. Top 20, 2 p.m. Disco Brunch
Part of the fun of ArtPrize is not just the chance to see so much art all around downtown Grand Rapids, but the opportunity to,about halfway through the contest, have the community come to hear and celebrate those artworks that have made it in the public vote’s Top 20. 

When we get to this point of the contest, round two voting becomes fierce, as these 20 works will now be competing to win your single vote and the much-coveted $200,000 ArtPrize Public Vote Grand Prize, which will be broadcast live on WZZM-13 later this week. 

But this special gathering on Sunday is not just exciting because of the Top 20 ArtPrize announcement, but because we welcome Disco Brunch and its eclectic programming to the main stage as your afternoon entertainment.

Disco Brunch — not an actual brunch — will entertain the ArtPrize crowd at Rosa Parks Circle with a DJ-driven dance party immediately following the Top 20 announcement. 

While Grand Rapids’s DJ culture has been making great strides over the years, the chance to hear  guest headliner DJ Pontchartrain (Dustin Alexander) of Detroit live on stage locally after experiencing his electrifying set at Movement Electronic Music Festival’s Red Bull Music Academy stage last May is very exciting for our local audience.

Unlike many of the major brands of DJs that pack massive arenas around the world, Pontchartrain’s arrival here in Grand Rapids, and in such an intimate setting as this park, is sure to turn heads and get feet to moving to his eclectic sound. 

"Electronic music has permeated our culture in ways never before thought possible; often embedded within an auto commercial or at a large scale sporting event, but certainly the art community has had a hand in embracing electronic music artists and the evolution of their sound,” says Todd Ernst co-founder of Disco Brunch with Mike Sayaw,  “ArtPrize is known for providing the framework to incubate new ideas and concepts, which makes (Rosa Parks Circle)  the perfect venue for Disco Brunch.”

Ernst’s belief is that Disco Brunch is not a literal name but an euphemism for dance, with the brunch representing the vast variety of musical offerings dance music is currently exploring in our world. 

In addition to Pontchartrain, Disco Brunch’s Todd Ernst & Mike Sayaw will be spinning throughout the afternoon with local guest DJ Joe Moon of the Vinyl Fetish DJ Collective. 

If you would like to hear a sample of Pontchartrain style, then waste no time loading up his just released remix of David Bowie’s “Let’s Dance.” Other cuts and mixes of his past shows can be found on his Sound Cloud site

Admission: Free

"Mr. Burns, A Post-Electric Play": The future of "The Simpsons"

It is rare that you get to mix two of my favorite things together, like peanut butter and chocolate, to make something really delicious to consume.  For fans of theater and “The Simpsons,” we have something really incredible that is landing on stage at Grand Rapids’ Actors’ Theatre. 

On September 29, one of the most talked about plays from our last decade, “Mr. Burns, A Post-Electric Play” by Anne Washburn, will make its West Michigan premiere on Grand Rapids Community College’s Spectrum Stage.

Washburn’s “Mr. Burns” begins as a group of individuals are in the woods, attempting to survive in a post-apocalyptic world where all the power has been cut off due to a world-wide atomic plant meltdown in which every facility is taken offline, plummeting the earth into a post-electric era. 

This first act of a three-act play, is devoted to these survivors’ favorite activity: recreating stories of the famous but now permanently dark “The Simpsons.”

To this cast of storytellers, one particular episode, “Cape Feare,” remains a stand out and becomes the thread that will take us forward to act two, which takes place seven years later.

During this act, the group members have formalized their love of this episode and are creating a theatrical group charged with telling this and other nostalgic-rich stories for a generation now emerging without the knowledge of what was “The Simpsons.” 

By the time we get to act three, the audience has been transported 75 years in the future — a full two generations later — and a new mythological society has emerged based on the culture born out of our present. 

“Mr. Burns” is unlike anything we have seen on stage locally and represents one of the best arguments for more story-telling set just a few moments into our future. 

If you enjoyed the dystopian humor and insights of “The Simpsons,” then “Mr. Burns” is just the play for you, as Washburn presents an unflinching look at human creativity and our life wedded to present pop culture. 

The first two acts make for a wonderfully rich springboard into Washburn’s future, where her plausible narrative of what could lie ahead for a society without electricity — a place where digital domains would be left buried like the tomb writings in Egypt — is not so far-fetched under her pen.

Again, “Mr. Burns” is not your parents’ theatre. And lucky are we for it. 

Admission: $28, adult; $22, senior/student; $10 student rush (available one hour before performance)

Visiting Artist Jen Delos Reyes: Open Engagement founder in Grand Rapids

In 2015, I made a road trip to Pittsburgh to experience Open Engagement — a conference devoted to looking at the ways that art can intersect with society outside of the gallery walls. In other words, where can art live if it is not in a studio, corporate collection, or on your home walls?

Little did I know at the time, but Open Engagement’s yearly eye-opening event was the creation and under the direction of Jen Delos Reyes, who will be the first guest speaker at the 2016 - 2017 Visiting Artist Lecture at Grand Valley State University (GVSU).

In keeping with the 2016-2017 lecture series theme of “Art and the Radical,” Reyes — a dynamic artist, educator, writer, and radical community arts organizer — will lead the audience through a series of examples of how one can create, support, and ultimately sustain an artist-led culture. 

Reyes recently released, “I’m Going to Live the Life I Sing About in My Song: How Artists Make and Live Lives of Meaning," a new book that details how art can merge within everyday life, and how doing so can shift power structures all around us.

Reyes was with the Portland State University from 2008-2014, where she created the first flexible residency Art and Social Practice MFA program in the United States and later devised a curriculum that focuses on place, engagement, and dialogue. Currently, she lives and works in Chicago, where she is the Associate Director of the School of Art and Art History at the University of Illinois Chicago. In 2017 Open Engagement will arrive in Chicago for its yearly conference after being in Oakland in 2016. 

According to GVSU, Art and the Radical’s focus this year features creative workers whose projects seek to deepen our understanding of the world by revealing alternate histories, highlighting marginalized communities, and challenging widely held beliefs and traditions.
Upcoming artists include Nicolas Lampert (Nov.7,) Jeanne Vaccaro (TBA), and Beatriz Santiago Munoz (TBA.)

Admission: Free
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