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Innovation & Job News

Fathom prepares for deep dive by launching ambitious Kickstarter Campaign to fund underwater drone




Fathom, a Holland, Michigan-based startup that was profiled in 2015 by Rapid Growth Media, has announced the launch of a $150,000 Kickstarter campaign starting August 30.
 
With these funds, the team -- Danny Vessells, John Boss, and Matt Gira -- will be able to finish testing, start production of their signature product -- an underwater drone, build inventory, and avoid using outside investors. The campaign will feature a variety of support levels, including a limited number of Fathom Ones at $400.
 
Fathom One is an easy-to-use, affordable ($600) underwater drone. Vessells says that competitive products are typically in the $1,600 to $20,000 range, making it difficult for for amateur underwater explorers and enthusiasts to afford them.
 
The Fathom One features a full HD camera on board with built-in high­ intensity LEDs, as well as a patent­ pending modular thruster attachment system. This system allows users to take off all three of the Fathom One’s thrusters in order to easily customize, upgrade, or pack the drone. It also features an integrated rail system on the bottom of the device that makes it simple to attach action cameras, lights, or other sensors to the drone. To extend the working range of the Fathom One, the Fathom team is designing a WiFi buoy that can transmit up to 100 feet away to any smart device.
 
Unlike aerial drones, the Fathom One has a tether attached to the device, making it easy to retrieve and preventing accidental loss due to currents or other conditions unique to underwater exploring. The device has been tested to depths of 35 feet, and the team is continuing to test, with a goal of being able to use it up to 150 feet below surface level. It has been tested in both fresh and salt water.
 
The Fathom team envisions multiple uses for the their drone, ranging from recreational use around island lakes to ocean exploring. Vessells says there will also be commercial uses, such as inspecting underwater pipelines and hulls of boats. “You will have the ability to see and experience things without being a certified scuba diver,” he says.
 
In the event of the Kickstarter campaign not reaching the $150,000 goal, the team is fully prepared to seek outside investment to keep the company moving forward. To date, Vessells estimates the team has invested around $30,000 into product development.
 
The Kickstarter campaign will go live on August 30. You can view it here at that time.
 
Writer: John Rumery, Innovation and Jobs News Editor
 
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